Site Update | June 21, 2011

Site Update | June 21, 2011

SITE UPDATE

PMAGAZINE: Premiere | March 1994

Interview by Peter Biskind and Photographed by Herb Ritts

Title:  Pair of Aces – Jack and Michelle dancing with ‘Wolf’

Another transcript from the PREMIERE magazine, and this time Michelle shares the cover with Wolfman Jack Nicholson, the whole article is focusing on director Mike Nichols, Jack Nicholson and the production of the “Wolf”, instead of the leading lady, as Michelle said “It’s Jack’s movie.” But if you’re a fans of this movie or the director, you should love it.

Although the content isn’t as rich as previous issues (on Michelle’s part), it remains to be my favorite Premiere cover of all time! And I really like her long and straight hair look both on this magazine cover and, of course, in the movie “WOLF”.


0 Comments

  • Alan
    July 2, 2013
    reply

    I saw “Wolf” once again on a cable service last night. Michelle does receive the short shrift in the movie “Wolf.” The script is underwritten for her character. She is assigned the persona of the spoiled hostile rich-bitch which she plays to the hilt. Nonetheless she manages to transcend the limitations of the role and shows real chemistry with Jack Nicholson. She consequently displays her remarkable acting range. Her performance is a departure even from her charming insouciance in “Grease 2”, her ice-queen in Scarface, and the complexities and coldness of her mother-love in “White Oleander.” In this movie her beauty is absolutely breathtaking, and the final scene displays her ethereal eyes as she transforms into a wolf.

  • Paul S
    August 10, 2013
    reply

    Pfeiffer seems to have had plenty of input into her character in Wolf: she apparently rejected the more stylized aspects of her part, such as wearing a red hood for her first encounter with the wolf, and dismissed turning Laura into a vet or park ranger as “camouflage . . . bullshit to make it interesting for someone.”

    Instead, she steered the role toward nobody and nothing: her desire was to play “someone who grew up not ever having any place . . . who’d probably never be more than that.”1 That sense of “busting out” unexpectedly has always been part of our engagement with her as an actress; her best roles (Married to the Mob, 1988, The Fabulous Baker Boys, 1989, The Age of Innocence, 1993) are arguably about the attempt to be more than nothing — characters trying to transcend their perceived vacuity. This is perhaps her most restrained “nothing” yet — and in a strange way, it’s Jack Nicholson’s as well.

  • Alan
    August 10, 2013
    reply

    Paul: It is very good that you are writing in Bond’s web page once again. Your analysis nails it. Vacuity: I especially think of Lurene in Love Field and Cheri in Cheri.
    At the end of second of two “Cheri novellas”, the author Colette demonstrated that vacuity kills when Cheri, coming to grips with his own vacuity and unlike the strong women that surround him, is unable to break out of it. He consequently puts a bullet through his own head. lea is the strong and contented survivor. I find it regrettable that more wasn’t made in the movie of Colette’s message. I think that it would have been a stronger film.
    Nonetheless, Michelle seems to be drawn to movies that deliver the vacuity message as you have expressed it. Perhaps her own escape to stardom from her early job bagging groceries at Von’s supermarket implanted the theme.
    As always, my fingers are crossed that the next film, “Malavita-The Family” is a breakthrough role for Michelle.

    And again, it ifs great to hear from you, Alan

  • Alan
    August 16, 2013
    reply

    Paul:

    I forgot to mention that your research on Michelle’s interpretation of Laura Alden is impeccable. I was caught by my own misread on the character’s premise. I do visit your website with some frequency for relaxation but school and work are consuming the energy that I use for unrelated writing and thinking. I appreciate the efforts that you and Bond expend on your websites. I must admit that I have become less enamored with Michelle’s choice of many the projects on which she has expended her fine acting skills. Incidentally, I also relax with Meg Ryan movies both to relieve my Michelle obsession and to learn more about a truly fine actress.
    My best to you,
    Alan

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